[ Pdf Les mots et les choses : Une archéologie des sciences humaines ✓ taxation PDF ] by Michel Foucault á izmirescort.pro

[ Pdf Les mots et les choses : Une archéologie des sciences humaines ✓ taxation PDF ] by Michel Foucault á I have now devoted nearly three months to doing close readings of nearly every book by Michel Foucault I can die happy Except, I m confused I know less now than I did before And that s precisely the point We are still living with Philosophical ideas from the Classical Period i.
e humanism, Neo Classical Liberalism, Capitalism, etc Yet Foucault shows, time and time again, that the institutions established during the Classical Period have taken on a life of their own, often times violently Yet we are all still trapped within the inertia of History A professor of mine explained everything I ever needed to know about Post Modern Subjectivity He said, Have you ever watched Terminator 3 Rise of the Machines No, I said He replied disgruntled, Where s your education Ok, so contemporary society is like the end of that movie John Conner goes t In this impressive book, Foucault takes on the basic organizational episteme of our current epoch He highlights the contemporary modality of our post modern world by tracing the development of our episteme from the 16th century to the present day.
While this may seem to be a simple tale of historical causation Foucault says explicitly on several occasions that he cannot account for the break between the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th century What he is referring to has several possible angles to it, which strongly emphasizes that in our current era we have not processed this break fully, that we are still within this logic and therefore unable to account for it.
One way to speak of this break is to note that in the Classical era, knowledge was mediated through a reference to the infinite This had the Between language and the theory of nature there exists therefore a relation that is of a critical type to know nature is, in fact, to build upon the basis of language a true language, one that will reveal the conditions in which all language is possible and the limits within which it can have a domain of validityp 161 There s no need to beat around the bush The Order of Things is, bar none, the densest read on my shelf to date Philosophy tyros steer clear an entry level text this is not To say that this was as difficult to read as it was to understand would be a heavy understatement Snippets patterned after the one above would frequently invite two and three peat readings to absorb before moving on to the next, equally demanding line of Foucaultian esoterica Michel Foucault, writing in the French philosophy tradition, is touted as a librarian of ideas, and his work It is quite possible that there was a lot to this book than I got out of it, and that Foucault s thinking might have been extremely exciting if only I could have decoded it I am not annoyed at the use of so many long and unfamiliar words, because sometimes long words do say something that shorter words can t I am not irritated that I had to look up lots of words nor that I had to struggle with the definitions to try to get my head around unfamiliar ways of thinkingI would expect all that from a post structuralist I did not expect that he would use his words in such an absolute way, not defining what he means by words even when he is using them in a slightly off centre way I am not sure whether my criticisms apply to FOUCAULT MICHEL himself or his translator.
I did not appreciate how many of the sentences ran on for over ten lines ten dense and adequately wide lines and t I have now devoted nearly three months to doing close readings of nearly every book by Michel Foucault I can die happy Except, I m confused I know less now than I did before And that s precisely the point We are still living with Philosophical ideas from the Classical Period i.
e humanism, Neo Classical Liberalism, Capitalism, etc Yet Foucault shows, time and time again, that the institutions established during the Classical Period have taken on a life of their own, often times violently Yet we are all still trapped within the inertia of History A professor of mine explained everything I ever needed to know about Post Modern Subjectivity He said, Have you ever watched Terminator 3 Rise of the Machines No, I said He replied disgruntled, Where s your education Ok, so contemporary society is like the end of that movie John Conner goes t In this impressive book, Foucault takes on the basic organizational episteme of our current epoch He highlights the contemporary modality of our post modern world by tracing the development of our episteme from the 16th century to the present day.
While this may seem to be a simple tale of historical causation Foucault says explicitly on several occasions that he cannot account for the break between the end of the 19th century and the start of the 20th century What he is referring to has several possible angles to it, which strongly emphasizes that in our current era we have not processed this break fully, that we are still within this logic and therefore unable to account for it.
One way to speak of this break is to note that in the Classical era, knowledge was mediated through a reference to the infinite This had the Between language and the theory of nature there exists therefore a relation that is of a critical type to know nature is, in fact, to build upon the basis of language a true language, one that will reveal the conditions in which all language is possible and the limits within which it can have a domain of validityp 161 There s no need to beat around the bush The Order of Things is, bar none, the densest read on my shelf to date Philosophy tyros steer clear an entry level text this is not To say that this was as difficult to read as it was to understand would be a heavy understatement Snippets patterned after the one above would frequently invite two and three peat readings to absorb before moving on to the next, equally demanding line of Foucaultian esoterica Michel Foucault, writing in the French philosophy tradition, is touted as a librarian of ideas, and his work It is quite possible that there was a lot to this book than I got out of it, and that Foucault s thinking might have been extremely exciting if only I could have decoded it I am not annoyed at the use of so many long and unfamiliar words, because sometimes long words do say something that shorter words can t I am not irritated that I had to look up lots of words nor that I had to struggle with the definitions to try to get my head around unfamiliar ways of thinkingI would expect all that from a post structuralist I did not expect that he would use his words in such an absolute way, not defining what he means by words even when he is using them in a slightly off centre way I am not sure whether my criticisms apply to FOUCAULT MICHEL himself or his translator.
I did not appreciate how many of the sentences ran on for over ten lines ten dense and adequately wide lines and t I don t really know what to make of Michel Foucault s The Order of Things Some things appear to be true in it, and other things new The things that are true aren t new, and the things that are new aren t true Foucault argues that there was a turning point in understanding and inquiry which occurred during the 18th century, perhaps near the tail end All fine so far, and that is surely one way to divide up intellectual history Foucault is right that the Age of Enlightenment brought about new ways of thinking about human beings and the world, but the rest I don t claim to understand.
Foucault has this complicated idea that language s role in knowledge changed into the 18th century How does he determine this Through p Michel Foucault is doing something with words in this book, which is actually trying to make something that should be easy to understand and explain quite complicated to follow, as he creates awesome sentences that last for ages and paragraphs that defy the laws of mathematics and understanding of the way words can be put in order one after the other Our friend Foucault has decided that explaining something in an easy to follow way is for people that don t really care about language, philosophy and the understanding of how the Western world has created itself as the time has advanced, with stops on how the people have explained to themselves and others different concepts, starting with the depiction of a picture from a Spanish painter which paints himself or maybe he doesn t or maybe he is painting the viewer to the most present obsession Librarian Note An Alternate Cover For This Edition Can Be Found HereWith Vast Erudition, Foucault Cuts Across Disciplines And Reaches Back Into Seventeenth Century To Show How Classical Systems Of Knowledge, Which Linked All Of Nature Within A Great Chain Of Being And Analogies Between The Stars In The Heavens And The Features In A Human Face, Gave Way To The Modern Sciences Of Biology, Philology, And Political Economy The Result Is Nothing Less Than An Archaeology Of The Sciences That Unearths Old Patterns Of Meaning And Reveals The Shocking Arbitrariness Of Our Received TruthsIn The Work That Established Him As The Most Important French Thinker Since Sartre, Michel Foucault Offers Startling Evidence That Man Man As A Subject Of Scientific Knowledge Is At Best A Recent Invention, The Result Of A Fundamental Mutation In Our Culture I m finished in the sense that I know I m not going to pick it up and continue again any time soon I made it to page 273, but I have found it a bit too boring and difficult to find the discipline to continue.
What Foucault has to say is fairly interesting, but after getting the gist of the idea from the introduction, and to be honest a synopsis of the contents I don t think there s much to be gained from actually reading the book I understand the idea of paradigm shift s in our body of knowledge and I believe they happen and that culture affects everything, including supposedly objective practices such as science However, Foucault s attempt to demonstrate this is narrow, unconvicing, full of unquestioned assumptions that what has taken place in Western Europe One of those books that I keep coming back to again and again The Order of Things the French title, Words and Things is probably precise is one of those key books that re orders the way you think It begins with a classic and bravura passage an analysis of Velasquez s Las Meninas that should be required reading for anyone interested in exegesis or hermeneutics The book goes on to discuss how we categorise and valorise knowledge how we choose to draw the boundaries of the objects in the world, how we prioritise kinds of knowledge Not an easy read, but a powerful one A key work highly recommended.
i have to admit that i foudn this really really complicated in most parts but the parts that i managed to understand were very very impressive i love books that glide my thinking into areas ive never ventured before and parts this does book does this there are three big areas Foucault covers intermittently throughout the book life, language and wealth money labour the book talks about history, episteme, epistemology, time inter alia there is a beautiful chapter right at the start which analyses a Velasquezs painting and no matter who i show that picture they dont seem to understand neither did i what the painting is trying to depict the book also talks a great deal of the classic period juxtaposed against where were are today and the end of man or the last man as fukuyama calls it there is also an amazing chapter on t



Michel Foucault is doing something with words in this book, which is actually trying to make something that should be easy to understand and explain quite complicated to follow, as he creates awesome sentences that last for ages and paragraphs that defy the laws of mathematics and understanding of the way words can be put in order one after the other Our friend Foucault has decided that explaining something in an easy to follow way is for people that don t really care about language, philosophy and the understanding of how the Western world has created itself as the time has advanced, with stops on how the people have explained to themselves and others different concepts, starting with the depiction of a picture from a Spanish painter which paints himself or maybe he doesn t or maybe he is painting the viewer to the most present obsession I don t really know what to make of Michel Foucault s The Order of Things Some things appear to be true in it, and other things new The things that are true aren t new, and the things that are new aren t true Foucault argues that there was a turning point in understanding and inquiry which occurred during the 18th century, perhaps near the tail end All fine so far, and that is surely one way to divide up intellectual history Foucault is right that the Age of Enlightenment brought about new ways of thinking about human beings and the world, but the rest I don t claim to understand.
Foucault has this complicated idea that language s role in knowledge changed into the 18th century How does he determine this Through p I m finished in the sense that I know I m not going to pick it up and continue again any time soon I made it to page 273, but I have found it a bit too boring and difficult to find the discipline to continue.
What Foucault has to say is fairly interesting, but after getting the gist of the idea from the introduction, and to be honest a synopsis of the contents I don t think there s much to be gained from actually reading the book I understand the idea of paradigm shift s in our body of knowledge and I believe they happen and that culture affects everything, including supposedly objective practices such as science However, Foucault s attempt to demonstrate this is narrow, unconvicing, full of unquestioned assumptions that what has taken place in Western Europe One of those books that I keep coming back to again and again The Order of Things the French title, Words and Things is probably precise is one of those key books that re orders the way you think It begins with a classic and bravura passage an analysis of Velasquez s Las Meninas that should be required reading for anyone interested in exegesis or hermeneutics The book goes on to discuss how we categorise and valorise knowledge how we choose to draw the boundaries of the objects in the world, how we prioritise kinds of knowledge Not an easy read, but a powerful one A key work highly recommended.
i have to admit that i foudn this really really complicated in most parts but the parts that i managed to understand were very very impressive i love books that glide my thinking into areas ive never ventured before and parts this does book does this there are three big areas Foucault covers intermittently throughout the book life, language and wealth money labour the book talks about history, episteme, epistemology, time inter alia there is a beautiful chapter right at the start which analyses a Velasquezs painting and no matter who i show that picture they dont seem to understand neither did i what the painting is trying to depict the book also talks a great deal of the classic period juxtaposed against where were are today and the end of man or the last man as fukuyama calls it there is also an amazing chapter on t

Michel Foucault

[ Pdf Les mots et les choses : Une archéologie des sciences humaines ✓ taxation PDF ] by Michel Foucault á izmirescort.pro Michel Foucault was a French philosopher, social theorist and historian of ideas He held a chair at the Coll ge de France with the title History of Systems of Thought, but before he was Professor at University of Tunis, Tunisia, and then Professor at University Paris VIII He lectured at several different Universities over the world as at the University at Buffalo, the University of California,